Amazing article. One question I have is about how to avoid the risk of FB terminating an ad account for using it to drive traffic to this kind of landing page. The first part of that question is, do you think a simple opt-in page like you described (with no content other than a "hook" that FB might argue is deceptive) would result in the ad being disapproved and possibly the ad account at risk of being terminated? The second part of the question is do you think the FB ad itself would need to be toned down, or do you think it's safe to just repeat the hook? It seems like FB is getting more and more strict about this kind of thing.

Websites and services based on Web 2.0 concepts—blogging and interactive online communities, for example—have impacted the affiliate marketing world as well. These platforms allow improved communication between merchants and affiliates. Web 2.0 platforms have also opened affiliate marketing channels to personal bloggers, writers, and independent website owners. Contextual ads allow publishers with lower levels of web traffic to place affiliate ads on websites.[citation needed]


It is important to note, however, that StudioPress is now a subsidiary of WPEngine which is the company that actually does the web hosting on which StudioPress’s Genesis framework runs. The affiliate program only works with choosing the StudioPress framework and themes, not the actual hosting on WPEngine. WPEngine has a separate affiliate program for its hosting services, which yes, is a bit confusing.

Some of the opportunity in this niche is going to be referring people to luxury brands that have higher order values than we might see on Amazon. I can’t disclose the person or the site, but one of my colleagues is in one of these niches and reported significant revenue increases from testing other affiliate programs against Amazon–before Amazongeddon.

Shopify is probably the most popular e-commerce solutions provider out there, but because there are so many products and options, newcomers can easily get confused. If you believe your audience has products to sell and could benefit from Shopify’s products and are able to elucidate the benefits of signing up for Shopify, you can definitely earn some big money with their affiliate program.
This is the standard affiliate marketing structure. In this program, the merchant pays the affiliate a percentage of the sale price of the product after the consumer purchases the product as a result of the affiliate’s marketing strategies. In other words, the affiliate must actually get the investor to invest in the product before they are compensated.
PeerFly only has a limited number of products at the moment, but they have tremendous momentum and are growing by leaps and bounds. Their payout rates aren’t spectacular, but everything is upfront and transparent, and affiliate satisfaction is very high. PeerFly is perfect for authentic marketers who want to offer high-quality products to their visitors as opposed to “get rich quick” schemes and opaque offers.
If the above locations do not yield information pertaining to affiliates, it may be the case that there exists a non-public affiliate program. Utilizing one of the common website correlation methods may provide clues about the affiliate network. The most definitive method for finding this information is to contact the website owner directly if a contact method can be located.
Miles, Great tutorial!! I absolutely need to change my mindset. Question: If I wanted to promote an offer, would it be ok to use a contest or giveaway, then add the affiliate link to the thank you page after they have given their email address? like " thanks so much for entering the contest, BTW, do you have a XXX issue? if so check out the button below.
I was interested in joining the Amazon associate program but the update rolled out. I haven’t started work as an Amazon affiliate so I was just curious to ask that is it fine if we send traffic only from social media platforms? Does Amazon allow only social traffic like Pinterest, Instagram? Will it result in a ban if we don’t add much content rather make it look like an e-commerce store?

Since the emergence of affiliate marketing, there has been little control over affiliate activity. Unscrupulous affiliates have used spam, false advertising, forced clicks (to get tracking cookies set on users' computers), adware, and other methods to drive traffic to their sponsors. Although many affiliate programs have terms of service that contain rules against spam, this marketing method has historically proven to attract abuse from spammers.
Many voucher code web sites use a click-to-reveal format, which requires the web site user to click to reveal the voucher code. The action of clicking places the cookie on the website visitor's computer. In the United Kingdom, the IAB Affiliate Council under chair Matt Bailey announced regulations[46] that stated that "Affiliates must not use a mechanism whereby users are encouraged to click to interact with content where it is unclear or confusing what the outcome will be."
Cost per action/sale methods require that referred visitors do more than visit the advertiser's website before the affiliate receives a commission. The advertiser must convert that visitor first. It is in the best interest of the affiliate to send the most closely targeted traffic to the advertiser as possible to increase the chance of a conversion. The risk and loss are shared between the affiliate and the advertiser.
Although it has a dynamic and well-designed website, PeerFly has a limited range of offers at any given time (around 8,000). On the upside, it does offer good commission/payout rates, lots of FAQs and educational information, and regular contests and reward programs that can substantially increase your bottom line. Based on online customer reviews, Peerfly enjoys a very high reputation amongst participating affiliates.

Hey Miles! I'm a total newbie when it comes to this and this article has been EXTREMELY helpful, so thank you! I am extremely grateful! I do have a question though and I'm hoping you have an answer and/or an alternative solution to this. I'm trying to use a custom domain name with my ClickFunnels account by integrating it via WordPress. I've installed the ClickFunnels plugin on my WordPress site and connected it with the API key and was able to set up the pages I wanted and the links I wanted to use for each step of my funnel, however; whenever I go to the links to test the sites it just redirects to a 404 page. I'm not sure what is going on and I can't find anything on the internet that suggests why this is happening. The weird thing is that I can get the Optin page to work if I set it as the Homepage in the ClickFunnels plugin but when you advance to the Thank You page it uses the bulky unattractive ClickFunnels link. Have you seen this before? If not, do you have a better way of using custom domain names with ClickFunnels?


For you to become an affiliate marketer here, you do not need to purchase them or seek permission to become an affiliate. All you need is to click the promote button, and you will have a platform to create your account. From here, you will receive an affiliate link that allows you to advertise anywhere. Once a person has clicked on the link you have provided and make a purchase, you will automatically get a commission for that sale.
Most businesses require startup fees as well as a cash flow to finance the products being sold. However, affiliate marketing can be done at a low cost, meaning you can get started quickly and without much hassle. There are no affiliate program fees to worry about and no need to create a product. Beginning this line of work is relatively straightforward.
Spam is the biggest threat to organic search engines, whose goal is to provide quality search results for keywords or phrases entered by their users. Google's PageRank algorithm update ("BigDaddy") in February 2006—the final stage of Google's major update ("Jagger") that began in mid-summer 2005—specifically targeted spamdexing with great success. This update thus enabled Google to remove a large amount of mostly computer-generated duplicate content from its index.[33]
Cost per action/sale methods require that referred visitors do more than visit the advertiser's website before the affiliate receives a commission. The advertiser must convert that visitor first. It is in the best interest of the affiliate to send the most closely targeted traffic to the advertiser as possible to increase the chance of a conversion. The risk and loss are shared between the affiliate and the advertiser.
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